LOW AMP DRAW,
HIGH AIR FLOW,
HIGH EFFICIENCY,
BRUSHLESS,
AND IT JUST GOES ON AND
ON...
E-mail: xfan@xfanbrushless.com
PH: 626.322.9203  
XFAN
675 Brea Canyon Rd. ,Suite 11
Walnut, CA 91789 USA
XFAN IS PRODUCT OF
S&S TECH
(C) 2006 S&S TECH.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
FAQ
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Q1.  I have no mods to my car, is there any gain for me to get a better electric
fan?

A1.  No if your stocked car has electric fan(s) in it.  Yes if your car / truck has a
clutch fan, and you wish to gain more acceleration on your car from each stop.  
An electric fan to replace a clutch fan will definitely help.

Q2.  Why should I go for a brushless fan instead of a brushed fan?

A2.  It is really a matter of performance.  A high-performance brushed fan would
actually work just fine as long as it delivers the air flow you are looking for.  There
are three major drawbacks from a brushed electric fan to be considered.  First
drawback is that a brushed fan's life is limited by its brushes that will eventually
be worn out.  Second drawback is that a brushed fan has efficiency of 50% to
60% which means a lot of energy is wasted.  Third drawback is that a brushed
fan has a starting current that is usually twice the amount of its continuous current
draw.  An XFAN does not have brushes so it lasts for very long time.  An XFAN
has efficiency up to 90% so it saves a lot of energy.  Finally, an XFAN has
current limiter with smooth start so it does not spike up a high current for each of
its start.

Q3.  Hey, I saw this aftermarket cooling fan that claims to deliver 3300+ CFM
with its "
high torque fan motors feature sealed ball bearings and fully balanced
blades.
"  Not to mention the price for the fan is very attractive so why should I
consider an XFAN?

A3.  Almost all electric fans out there have sealed ball bearings.  But even
bearings have their low end to high end products.  Our fans use NSK sealed ball
bearings that are imported from Japan.  Our fan blades are also balanced for
less vibrations and for longer life of the motor.  We heard about the fan you
mentioned and we highly recommend you to measure the fan with the following
instruments.  Get an air meter and an ammeter to measure the fan's FPM vs. its
amp reading.  To obtain CFM simply multiply the averaged FPM by the area (in
sqr ft) covered by the fan blade minus the "dead zone" area of the fan where the
motor occupies.  You might be surprised what you are going to find out.

Q4.  What is the difference between brushed and brushless motors?

A4.  Please read "The Motor" section for great details on this topic.  You may
click here to get there.